No doubts, you remember eating raisins in your early childhood … and on. Raisins are common natural candies that offer plenty of health benefits. They are quick and easy to consume.

Raisins are sweet due to their high natural content of sugars. They are rich in certain antioxidants and dietary fiber, a carb that our body cannot digest (meaning that is actually is not a “carb”). Among dried fruits and nuts, raisins have one of the highest concentrations of boron. Raisins are rich in potassium and low in sodium. They also contain 3% protein, decent amounts of B vitamins, copper and iron, and no cholesterol.

Raisins are a wonderful and healthy snack that helps regulate your blood pressure, potassium-sodium balance, carbohydrates metabolism, digestive system functioning, sexual drive, bone and joint health and much more.

Raisins are tasty and healthy. It’s really hard to find an excuse not to include them in your daily menu.

Raisins – Sweet Memory from Your Childhood

7 Health Benefits of Raisins

Raisins Natural Healing Power

Raisins can contain up to 80% sugars by weight: about 30% fructose and 28% glucose by weight. They are high in certain antioxidants and have 4%–7% dietary fiber, a carb with a low glycemic index. Raisins are rich in potassium and low in sodium. They also contain 3% protein, decent amounts of B vitamins, copper and iron, and no cholesterol. Among dried fruits and nuts, raisins have one of the highest concentrations of boron-containing between 2 and 3 mg per 100 grams.

Raisins Nutritional Value

Published in the “Journal of the American College of Cardiology” in 2012, a study suggests that eating raisins on a daily basis may significantly lower blood pressure [1].

Low potassium is a common issue in the standard American diet. Potassium is an essential nutrient that plays a dramatic role in maintaining heart muscle contractions and nervous system healthy and balancing the body’s overall metabolism. Sodium and potassium are the two primary electrolytes in your body that act like yin and yang. Raisins are rich in potassium and low in sodium, having health-beneficial potassium to sodium ratio. You have to continually supply your body with potassium. A high-potassium and low-sodium diet help prevent high blood pressure and an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. A healthy adult should get about 4,700mg of potassium and no more than 2,300mg of sodium per day. People who get a lot of potassium in their diets have a lower risk of stroke.

It has been shown that raisins may reduce the risk for malignancies in the stomach and colon due to a high content of antioxidants such as catechins. Antioxidants scavenge the free radicals in the body, one of the primary underlying factors that lead to the spontaneous growth of cancer cells [2]

Raisins are rich in dietary fiber and have a moderate glycemic index. They even can be consumed in small amounts by diabetic patients instead of sweets. Replacing unhealthy snacks with raisins as a dietary habit has shown positive benefits in patients with type 2 diabetes, including reduced diastolic blood pressure and increased levels of plasma antioxidants [3].

Raisins have long been known to stimulate the libido and induce arousal, primarily due to the presence of an amino acid called arginine, which is beneficial in treating erectile dysfunction. Arginine also increases the levels of sperm motility. It is a common practice in India to make the bride and the groom drink a glass of milk each, boiled with raisins and a pinch of saffron on their wedding night. It is also recommended for those suffering from issues of sexual endurance to consume raisins regularly [4].

You might not believe that sweet and sticky raisins can reverse cavities and heal tooth decay. One research suggests that raisins can benefit oral health because the fruit possesses antimicrobial phytochemicals, such as oleanolic acid, that suppress the growth of oral bacteria which causes dental cavities and gum disease [5].

Boron may be important for maintaining healthy. It has been shown to benefit testosterone synthesis [5].

Raisins – Sweet Memory from Your Childhood

Raisins are tasty and healthy. It’s really hard to find an excuse not to include them in your daily menu.

Referrences

  1. Kanellos, P. T.; Kaliora, A. C.; Gioxari, A.; Christopoulou, G. O.; Kalogeropoulos, N.; Karathanos, V. T. (2013). “Absorption and Bioavailability of Antioxidant Phytochemicals and Increase of Serum Oxidation Resistance in Healthy Subjects Following Supplementation with Raisins”. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 68
  2. Kountouri, Aggeliki M.; Gioxari, Aristea; Karvela, Evangelia; Kaliora, Andriana C.; Karvelas, Michalis; Karathanos, Vaios T. (2013). “Chemopreventive properties of raisins originating from Greece in colon cancer cells”. Food & Function. 4.
  3. Kanellos, Panagiotis T.; Kaliora, Andriana C.; Liaskos, Christos; Tentolouris, Nikolaos K.; Perrea, Despina; Karathanos, Vaios T. (2013). “A Study of Glycemic Response to Corinthian Raisins in Healthy Subjects and in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients”. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. 68.
  4. http://www.inchem.org/documents/ehc/ehc/ehc204.htm
  5. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1874390008000542
(Visited 4 times, 1 visits today)